Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th Global Ophthalmologists Annual Meeting Osaka, Japan.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Stephen G. Odaibo

Quantum Lucid Research Laboratories

Keynote: Cracking the Neural Code for Vision

Time : 9:00

OMICS International Ophthalmologists 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Stephen G. Odaibo photo
Biography:

Dr. Stephen G. Odaibo is a Nigerian-born Physician, Mathematician, Computer scientist, Neuroscientist, Physicist, and Retina specialist. He won the 2005 Barrie Hurwitz Award for Excellence in Clinical Neurology at Duke University School of Medicine where he topped the class in Neurology. Dr. Odaibo is Chief Scientist and Founder of Quantum Lucid Research Laboratories, an Independent Computational Research Institute. He is also a Retina specialist at the Medical Associates Clinic in Dubuque Iowa.Dr. Odaibo obtained a B.S. in Mathematics (UAB, 2001), M.S. in Mathematics (UAB, 2002), M.S. in Computer Science (Duke, 2009), and Doctor of Medicine--MD (Duke, 2010). From 2004 to 2006, Dr. Odaibo was in the lab studying G-protein coupled receptors with Robert J. Lefkowitz, the 2012 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry. Dr. Odaibo completed his Internship in Internal Medicine at Duke University Hospital (Durham) in 2011, his Residency in Ophthalmology at Howard University Hospital (Washington DC) in 2014, and his Fellowship in Medical Retina, Uveitis, and Ocular Oncology at the University of Michigan-Kellogg Eye Center (Ann Arbor) in 2015. He has published textbooks in advanced Mathematics and Physics. He is author of the book, ``Quantum Mechanics and the MRI Machine'' (Symmetry Seed Books, Oct 2012), and of the book "The Form of Finite Groups: A Course on Finite Group Theory" (Symmetry Seed Books, Jan 2016). Dr. Odaibo has received a number of recognitions and awards. He won the 2013 Best Resident Research Presentation Award at the 23rd Annual Washington Retina Symposium, for devising the Sinc wavelet, a mathematical model describing the behaviour of motion-processing neurons. In 2012 he was selected as a Featured Alumnus of the Mathematics Department at UAB. In Oct 2011 his cornea paper was selected by MIT Technology Review as one of the best papers from Physics or Computer science submitted to the arXiv. In that paper, Dr. Odaibo provided the first quantitative demonstration of non-paraxial light bending in the human cornea. Dr. Odaibo's research interest is Algebraic Structures, a branch of pure Mathematics. His clinical interests are in the diagnosis and Pharmacological/Laser management of retinal disease. The conditions he treats include macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy, retinal vascular occlusions, retinal tears, and localized retinal detachments. He enjoys taking care of his patients, and feels truly blessed at the opportunity to provide them compassionate, evidence-based, state-of-the-art retina care. He loves his wife Lisa, his son Daniel, his family and friends, and studying the bible in its rich historical context.

Abstract:

Every time you look out at a visual scene, the neurons in your visual cortex respond in a certain way. They do so by changing their firing rate in response to the visual scene. Therefore each visual scene is represented in your brain by some specific pattern of neuronal firing. This is the neural code for vision. Understanding this code will potentially mean we can someday enable blind people see by stimulating the brain to represent the visual scene in their line of sight. In this talk, I will present some background on this problem, and I will discuss the subproblem of “cracking the code for visual motion”. In particular, I will present our research results about the behavior of motion-processing neurons in the visual cortex. And I will describe how at Quantum Lucid Research Labs, we are beginning to understand the code for neurons which help us see moving objects.

  • Symposium on Everything you need to know about selective laser trabeculoplasty in Chinese
Speaker

Chair

Jimmy S M Lai

The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Session Introduction

Jimmy S M Lai

The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Title: Everything you Need to Know About Selective Laser Trabeculoplasty in Chinese
Speaker
Biography:

Jimmy S M Lai received his pre-fellowship training in the Princess Alexandra Eye Pavilion, Edinburgh and post-fellowship training in the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston, and the Aichi University, Nagoya, Japan. He is a pioneer in glaucoma research, in particular, the use of argon laser peripheral iridoplasty (ALPI) to the initial treatment of acute angle closure glaucoma and acute phacomorphic glaucoma and introducing the selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) and goniosynechialysis (GSL) to Hong Kong for the treatment of open angle and closed angle glaucoma. He is currently the Acting Head of the Department of Ophthalmology at the University of Hong Kong.

Abstract:

This instruction course will detail practical pearls of using the selective laser trabeculoplasty (SLT) in the treatment of all primary glaucoma subtypes: primary open angle glaucoma, primary angle closure glaucoma, and normal tension glaucoma. It will compass evidence-based information and instructor’s experiences on the following: the clinical indications for treatment, laser techniques (do’s and don’ts), potential complications and their management, post-laser medications and follow-up, repeated treatments, and the predictors of laser success and failure. The course will focus on using the SLT in Asian eyes, which are relevantly different to the Caucasian counterparts in terms of angle opening and pigmentations.

  • Track 1 Ophthalmic Vision Science
    Track 2 Ophthalmology Surgery
    Track 3 Ophthalmology Practice
    Track 4 Retina and Retinal diseases
    Track 5 Glaucoma

Session Introduction

Professor Ningli Wang

Director of Beijing Tongren Eye Center /President of Chinese Ophthalmology Society

Title: Canaloplasty for POAG with Failed Filltering Surgery
Speaker
Biography:

Professor Ningli Wang is the Director of Beijing Tongren Eye Center and the vice president of Beijing Tongren Hospital, which is one of the two largest eye centers in China and provides a comprehensive and seamless Ophthalmic Service for 30,0000 outpatients and 54,000 surgeries annually. He is also the Director of Beijing Institute of Ophthalmology and the president of School of Ophthalmology, Capital Medical University.

Abstract:

Canaloplasty for POAG with failed filtering surgery: Glaucoma is a leading cause of irreversible blindness. For many patients, surgical intervention is finally necessary to preserve the remaining vision. Glaucoma filtering surgery (GFS) is the main choice, which creates constant shunting of aqueous from anterior chamber into newly built subconjunctival space. Despite a great improvement, GFS has documented high complications and failure rate especially for primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) received repeated GFS, who runs higher risk of bleb insufficiency. Canaloplasty, a new non-filtering, bleb-free method, provides good IOP reduction with a favorable safety profile for POAG as initial procedure. We practiced 24 canaloplasty on POAG with failed GFS. For 18 patients with intact SC, a standard canaloplasty was done. Circumferential catheterization achieved in 89.2% eyes. In one year, IOP decreased by 34.1% (from 28.3±8.4 to 15.5±2.5 mm Hg), with topical medication reduced from 2.9±0.7 to 0.7±1.5. Surgery rate was 52.4% for complete success and 77.4% qualified criteria, both of which were similar as canaloplasty as an initial procedure. For patients with broken SC, we proposed modified canaloplasty, relying on our new technique of relay suture guided by illuminated trocar. Circumferential catheterization achieved in 83.3% eyes. At 9-months, IOP reduced to 17.7±4.5 mmHg and mean glaucoma medication use was 1.0±1.0 (baseline values were 32.5±5.2 for IOP and 3.2±0.4 for medication). For both groups, hyphema and clinically detectable bleb were the most common complications. According to our results, canaloplasty is a new, efficient and safe option for POAG with failed GFS.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Sunalp's graduated from Oxford University Medical School at St. John’s College and continued his post-graduate medical education in ophthalmology at Stanford and the University of Southern California. His most recent educational accomplishment has been an MBA at the University of Tennessee. Throughout his career he has remained up to date on medical advancements by both participating and teaching continuing medical education courses. Dr. Sunalp has provided state of the art ophthalmologic services in the San Joaquin valley for the last 30 years. He has developed innovative techniques to treat common eye diseases in a safe and effective manner.

Abstract:

Purpose: We have devised a new method to mark the corneal axis of Toric IOL that is inexpensive and precise. Methods: In the office, a drop of ophthaine is placed on the eye, and the patient is asked to place his/her chin on the chin-rest of the Yag laser. The “Sunalp Yag laser lens’ is placed on the para limbal cornea with 90º lens corresponding to the 90º of the patient cornea. The Yag laser is focused at the mid cornea at 270º and a single laser pulse of 10 mjoules is aimed at 270º with 1-3 pulses in line, 0.5 mm apart. The laser pulse marks the cornea with a small disruption and blanching of the stroma that remains visible for 48 hours or longer. The Sunalp Yag laser lens is a 1 cm, 12 diopter single-use, acrylic lens, which will be available in the near furure. Results: Presurgical corneal marking using the Sunalp Yag laser lens, a lens specially designed for the Yag laser, allows for accurate alignment of toric IOL during surgical implantation. The markings remain clearly visible throughout the procedure and for an additional 48 hours, giving ample time for pre op marking. Conclusion: To avoid the pitfalls of preoperative unreliable marking with an ink pen, we have devised a method to mark the cornea using the Yag Laser. Using the Sunalp Yag laser lens, precise, durable makring can be made without the use of expensive equipment.

Speaker
Biography:

Michael K Yoon is a full time Faculty Clinician and Scientist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary/Schepens Eye Research Institute, teaching institutions of Harvard Medical School. His clinical expertise is in orbital diseases including tumors, thyroid eye disease and trauma. His research has focused on orbital anatomy and computer analysis of various structures. He has published over 55 peer-reviewed articles.

Abstract:

Metastatic scirrhous breast carcinoma to the orbit is a rare condition. It can cause a paradoxical decrease in the volume of the orbit causing secondary enophthalmos of the affected orbit. Other presenting signs include ptosis, superior sulcus deformity and diplopia. In some cases, the amount of tumor visible on CT or MRI can be much less than the actual degree of involvement. In order to better understand this rare and unusual condition, we performed a volumetric analysis of the various soft tissue components of the orbit using CT and MRI imaging. Imaging software associated with our hospital imaging interface (Synapse, FujiFilm, Tokyo, Japan) was utilized to outline the perimeter and calculate volume of the following structures on each slice of the image: orbit, globe, optic nerve, extraocular muscles, lacrimal gland, fat and visible tumor. Four cases of unilateral metastatic scirrhous breast carcinoma were identified. Imaging demonstrates the tumors as homogenous moderate density masses with indistinct borders. The mean volumes of the optic nerve, muscle and lacrimal glands were not statistically significant (p=0.36, 0.10, 0.15, respectively). The difference in orbital fat was nearly significant (10.43 normal vs. 9.00 diseased, p=0.06). Mean tumor volume was 0.29 cc. Although the tumor volume remains small, there can be a disproportionate degree of enophthalmos. In patients with a history of breast carcinoma who develop enophthalmos, even small areas of abnormality on imaging can denote more widespread tumor and should be biopsied.

Ian Wong

The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Title: Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy – All You Need to Know
Speaker
Biography:

Ian Wong is currently Clinical Assistant Professor at the Department of Ophthalmology, LKS Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong (HKU). Since then, he has devoted his time and effort in academic research, and has to date published 42 international peer-reviewed journal articles. Other than that, he has written 7 book chapters, including one in the book RETINA 5e. He recently took up the role of Editor-in-Chief of the Hong Kong Journal of Ophthalmology.

Abstract:

PCV is characterized by recurrent subretinal pigment epithelial hemorrhages. Before indocyanine-green angiography (ICG) imaging was popular, PCV was sometimes misdiagnosed as neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). With the advent of imaging modalities and deeper understandings of the disease, PCV is now recognized as a separate entity, with its own unique profile of clinical manifestations. Treatment strategy towards PCV has been revolutionized by recent clinical trials using combination therapy with ranibizumab and verteporfin. Currently, significant differences exist between treatment for PCV and neovascular AMD. There is a clear need in distinguishing PCV from neovascular AMD. Clinical photos, ICG findings, and optical coherence tomography scans will be used to illustrate real cases. Small quiz towards end of course will help audience fortify knowledge acquired. At the conclusion of this course, the audience will be able to distinguish a case of PCV, from a case of neovascular AMD. They will know how to formulate treatment strategies for a new case of PCV, and the most up-to-date evidences involved.

Amy C Y Lo

The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong

Title: Protecting the Developing Retina in Retinopathy of Prematurity
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Amy Lo obtained her Bachelor Degree (Distinction) in Chemistry from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and continued her education in the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where she received her Doctoral degree from the Department of Neuroscience. She then joined the Institute of Molecular Biology in The University of Hong Kong as a Post-doctoral Fellow and later joined the Eye Institute (Department of Ophthalmology) as Assistant Professor. Her main research interest is neuroprotection in human diseases such as stroke and retinal diseases, focusing on the investigation of mechanisms controlling neuronal degeneration using experimental animal models and on the development of new molecular and cellular therapeutic approaches.

Abstract:

Retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) is a major ocular disorder of the pre-term neonates with unsatisfactory treatment. In ROP, uncontrolled neovascularization happens and may protrude into vitreous cavity, leading to lipid exudates and bleeding, which can impair vision severely. Both clinical and basic research supports the role of oxidative stress in ROP. Using a murine oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) model, the animal model for ROP, we showed that genetic deletion of aldose reductase (AR), the first enzyme in the polyol pathway that uses NAD(P)H as a cofactor for glucose metabolism, is beneficial in protecting the neonatal retina in OIR. AR-deficient retinae displayed smaller central retinal vaso-obliterated area, less neovascularization and reduced blood vessel leakage after OIR. The attenuated amplitudes and delayed implicit time of a-wave, b-wave and oscillatory potentials recorded in electroretinogram were recovered in these retinae. There were also less morphological change in horizontal, rod bipolar and amacrine cells. Taken together, AR deficiency reduced retinal vascular changes and preserved retinal neuronal function in the mouse model of OIR, suggesting a therapeutic potential of AR inhibition in ROP treatment with beneficial effects on both retinal vessels and neurons.

Speaker
Biography:

Prof. Ayala Pollack is a Professor and Chairperson of the Ophthalmology Department at Kaplan Medical Center. She graduated from the Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University with the honour of distinction and award for excellent thesis. During Medical school she started basic science research in the Department of Embryology and Teratology, Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, She completed training in Ophthalmology Kaplan Medical Center and in the Department of Ophthalmology, Rothschild Hospital, Haifa, Israel affiliated to the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology.

Abstract:

Purpose: To evaluate the course of wet AMD in eyes undergoing phacoemulsification and previously treated with anti-VEGF injections. Methods: Records of patients ≥50 years with AMD who underwent uneventful phacoemulsification and had completed a minimum of 6 months follow-up (F-U) after surgery were retrospectively reviewed. Patients with complicated surgery and incomplete data were excluded. Data recorded were best corrected visual acuity (VA), fundoscopy and OCT at beginning of F-U, prior to surgery, 1 month after surgery and at the end of F-U. Also recorded were number and timing of injections before and after surgery. Results: Included were 42 eyes of 38 patients with wet AMD receiving intravitreal anti-VEGF injections prior to surgery. VA improved significantly 1 month postoperatively, without a significant change in retinal thickness. Thirty two (76%) were “dry” and 10 (24%) were still “wet” just before surgery. Twenty six patients (62%) needed anti-VEGF injections during follow-up after surgery within average of 6 months. In eyes that were "dry" preoperatively the re-injection rate was lower than those that were still "wet" (56% vs. 80% respectively). The average time from surgery to the first injection was longer in preoperative "dry" than in "wet" eyes (7 and 3 months, respectively). Conclusions: In this study, cataract removal improves vision in wet AMD patients. In eyes that were stable within 6 months before surgery and their retina was dry preoperativly, the re-injection rate post surgery was lower and the time to first injection was longer as compared to those that were "wet" preoperatively. We suggest to consider drying the retina prior to surgery and to follow them closely postoperatively.

Speaker
Biography:

Elie Beit-Yannai has completed his PhD at the Hebrew University Jerusalem, Israel. He leads research teams at the bio-tech industry and joined Ben-Gurion University in 2004. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The trabecular meshwork TM is dynamic tissue responding to pressure stimuli and cellular signaling. TM increase in drainage resistance had been attributed to increase in intra ocular pressure, a major risk for glaucoma development. In previous study in our lab we were able to show that signaling between the non-pigmented ciliary epithelium (NPCE) and the TM exist, resulting in changes in protein expression and activity. We hypothesized that these intra drainage system tissue communications is carried, at least partially by exosomes. Exosomes are nanoparticles carrying a cargo of proteins, mRNAs and micro-RNAs which are believed to deliver signaling molecules that affect this outflow. Exosomes were extracted from NPCE cell line, characterized for size, Zeta potential, protein content and specific exosomes markers. Then, NPCE derived exosomes were incubated with human TM cell line and the exosomes fate was traced using confocal microscopy. Signaling pathway changes and their downstream effects were examined. We were able to show that NPCE derived exosome accumulate along time in the TM cells cytosol with specify. Within the TM cells the NPCE derived exosomes interfere with signaling pathway resulting in changes in key adhesion molecules.

Speaker
Biography:

Wen-Chuan Wu has completed his Medical Degree from Kaohsiung Medical University and Ophthalmology Training at Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital. He is the Chairman of Taiwan Macular Society. He has published more than 50 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Purpose: To analyze the long-term dynamic healing process of outer retinal changes for 1 year in patients who underwent a standard vitrectomy procedure for idiopathic macular hole (MH) repair. Design: Retrospective, consecutive, observational case series. Methods: Data were collected on 60 eyes of 56 patients (30 women, 26 men) that underwent successful pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) and internal limiting membrane (ILM) peeling for idiopathic MH from January 2011 to December 2012. The age distribution ranged from 56 to 85 years (mean: 64 years). Forty eyes underwent combined phacoemulsification, PPV, ILM peeling, and intraocular lens implantation; 20 preoperative pseudophakic eyes underwent PPV and ILM peeling only. The main outcome measures included logMAR best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) and macular microstructures determined by spectral-domain optical coherence tomography performed pre- and postoperatively during follow-up visits at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. Results: One month after surgery, 24 eyes (40%) showed normal external limiting membrane (ELM), 36 eyes (60%) showed normal ELM at 3 months and 54 eyes (90%) showed normal ELM 12 months after surgery. Six eyes (10%) revealed a continuous ellipsoid zone (EZ) at 1 month, 18 eyes (30%) at 3 months and 48 eyes (80%) at 12 months postoperatively. There were no eyes with a disrupted ELM in the presence of an intact EZ line. The eyes with intact ELM and or intact EZ line showed better BCVA than eyes with defects in ELM or EZ line. On the contrary, glial cell presentation is significantly associated with worse postoperative BCVA. However, the presence of foveal cystoid change is not significantly associated with postoperative BCVA. Conclusions: The ELM and EZ line at the fovea recovered and the presence of glial cells and cystoid space resolved gradually after surgery. The postoperative visual acuity was correlated with resolved glial cells and a restored ELM and EZ line.

Speaker
Biography:

Ellen Koo, MD is an Assistant Professor at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. She specializes in Cornea, Corneal Transplants and Cataract Surgery. She completed her Fellowship training in Cornea, Cataract Surgery and Refractive Surgery at the Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Prior to that, she completed her Ophthalmology residency at Brown University, Warren Alpert Medical School. She obtained her Medical Doctorate at the Eastern Virginia Medical School and her Bachelor’s of Arts Degree at the Johns Hopkins University. She serves as a reviewer for “The Journal of Ocular Immunology and Inflammation” and “The Journal of Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology”.

Abstract:

Cataract surgery is considered a safe and highly successful procedure in the United States. The advent of femtosecond laser technology now provides newer and possibly safer options for the surgeon to successfully carry out cataract surgery. One of the possible advantages of the femtosecond laser, is that the laser technology creates a replicable and thus possibly a more structurally sound, clear corneal incision. As cataract surgery in this day and age is now expected, by patients, to be largely “suture-less,” the risks of endophthalmitis are now deemed to be higher as a direct correlation to the increase in popularity in clear corneal incisions. The clear corneal wound needs to be structurally sound, as a leaky clear corneal wound becomes a direct entry site for bacterial species. While the prospect of a safer, replicable surgery is appealing, it is important to also consider the possible disadvantages of the laser technology. The usage of femtosecond laser technology in creating the laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis (LASIK), as opposed to the older method of the handheld micro-keratome, has been commonly used as an analogy. There has been a rise in Diffuse Lamellar Keratitis (DLK) with the increase in usage of the femtosecond laser in flap creation; though the exact causes of DLK remain unknown, it has been proposed that the laser induces “collateral” damage—cell death and inflammation of the corneal epithelium and thus possibly contributory to the rise of DLK cases. The anterior segment OCT could possibly lend us more insight into the possibility of “collateral” damage from the femtosecond laser when used in FLACS—thickness and structural changes of the different layers of the cornea, especially the epithelium, the stroma and the endothelium, could possible clue us into immediate collateral damage from the laser.

Shao-Chun Chen

Department of Ophthalmology, Taipei City Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

Title: Dialysis Induced Ischemic Optic Neuropathy
Speaker
Biography:

Shao-Chun Chen completed his MD at the age of 25 years from Chang-Gung University. He specializes in Neuro-ophthalmology and Strabismus. He completed his Fellowship training at the Kitasato University and Hamamastu University. He is the Deputy executive secretary of Institutional Review Board and Specialist of Tissue Bank in the Taipei City Hospital. He has published more than 10 papers in international ophthalmological meetings.

Abstract:

The ischemic optic neuropathy (ION) is one of the most common acute optic neuropathy in the aged population. We usually categorized ION into nonarteritic or arteritic. The vasculitis is the leading cause of arteritic one, where compartment syndrome in optic-nerve hand is the pathophysiology of the nonarteritic one. There are many specific symptoms and signs can help us to classify which type of ION belongs. Dialysis is associated with many kinds of ocular problems. These include chronic conjunctival inflammation, metastatic corneal calcification, bullous retina detachment, and ION. Here we review the reported patients who had dialysis-induced ION. We analysis the age, gender, onset, laterality, visual outcome, visual field change, and fluorescein angiography. We find this group of ION presentation does not belong to arteritic ION or nonarteritic ION. We suspect this particular type of ION belongs to the venous stasis induced optic-disc hypoperfusion.

Speaker
Biography:

Yong Cheng has completed his MD from Peking University. He specializes in vitreo-retinal disorders that require either medical or surgical treatment. He has taken part in lots of multicenter research and published more than 10 papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Objectives: To compare the outcomes of Conbercept therapy between two different angiographic subtypes of Polypoidal Choroidal Vasculopathy (PCV) Methods: Fifty-eight patients of PCV were classified into two phenotypes according to indocyanine green angiography (ICGA). In type-1, both feeder and draining vessels are visible on ICGA and network vessels are numerous. In type-2, neither feeder nor draining vessels are detectable and the number of network vessels is small. The patients were treated with intravitreal Conbercept (IVC) for 3 months. Additional IVC was given at subsequent monthly visits, if needed. The patients were followed-up for 12 months and changes in mean BCVA, central retinal thickness (CRT), serous retinal detachment (SRD), hemorrhage and number of Polypoidal lesions were evaluated. Results: The mean BCVA in type-2 PCV (15.92±9.7614.10±9.07) achieved a significantly greater improvement in than the type-1 (14.10±9.07) at month 12 (p<0.01). And the mean CRT decrease was numerically greater in type-2 (120.44±73.81) compared with type-1 (106.48±72.33) at month 6 (p<0.01) and greater in type-2 (130.21±76.28) compared with type-1 (111.67±79.57) at month 9 (p<0.01). There was no significant difference between the two groups for the decrease in SRF thickness, PED height and regression of polyps from month 3 to 12 (p>0.05). Conclusions: Classification systems for PCV will show differences in presentation, natural history or response to anti-VEGF treatment and might therefore provide a new key to the choice of treatment of the disease.

  • Teaching course on Clinical application of corneal collagen cross-linking – Keratoconus and Beyond
Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Kendrick Co Shih, MBBS MRCSEd Clinical Assistant Professor in Ophthalmology, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong Expertise: Early and Late Management of Ocular Surface Inflammatory Disorders
Dr. Richie Chiu-Lung Chan, MBBS FHKCS (Plastic Surgery) Specialist in Plastic Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Expertise: Acute and Long-Term Systemic Care for Burn Patients

Abstract:

The focus of the instruction course is Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. The course is divided into 1) immediate and early medical and surgical care of patients with SJS/TEN 2) long-term care of late ocular manifestations 3) surgical options for visual and ocular surface rehabilitation. This instruction course is intended for general ophthalmologists who are keen to develop a systematic and effective approach in the management of severe inflammatory ocular surface disease. It is also intended for the cornea/anterior segment subspecialists who wish to expand their surgical skills. The surgical procedures discussed for this session will include amniotic membrane transplantation, eyelid reconstruction and keratoprosthesis. Objectives: At the conclusion of this course, the attendee will be able to 1) Describe the appropriate immediate and early care for patients with SJS/TEN 2) Recognize long-term ocular complications of SJS/TEN and describe appropriate management 3) Describe patient selection and surgical options for visual rehabilitation.

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Richie Chiu-Lung Chan, MBBS FHKCS (Plastic Surgery) Specialist in Plastic Surgery, Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong Expertise: Acute and Long-Term Systemic Care for Burn Patients

Abstract:

The focus of the instruction course is Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis. The course is divided into 1) immediate and early medical and surgical care of patients with SJS/TEN 2) long-term care of late ocular manifestations 3) surgical options for visual and ocular surface rehabilitation. This instruction course is intended for general ophthalmologists who are keen to develop a systematic and effective approach in the management of severe inflammatory ocular surface disease. It is also intended for the cornea/anterior segment subspecialists who wish to expand their surgical skills. The surgical procedures discussed for this session will include amniotic membrane transplantation, eyelid reconstruction and keratoprosthesis. Objectives: At the conclusion of this course, the attendee will be able to 1) Describe the appropriate immediate and early care for patients with SJS/TEN 2) Recognize long-term ocular complications of SJS/TEN and describe appropriate management 3) Describe patient selection and surgical options for visual rehabilitation.